Yesterday, we brought you a video of a bagpiper playing a traditional Basque melody on the San Sebastian beachfront while some young Basque women danced in the traditional style full of good humor and joy.  Such a brief clip, just under half a minute of video, really brightened our day.

Today, another series of videos, with music and dancing, have done the same.  The dancers in both sets of videos are separated by 5,300 mi (8,500 km), but they are moved by the same spirit and same heart: love of the culture and traditions of the Basque nation.

In this case, it’s boys and girls and young men and women showing off their dantzari skills at the 2021 Elko’s National Basque Festival.  This is a true tradition in the Western US, and it’s finally back after the worst of the global pandemic has subsided.

But neither the distance nor the ocean that separates them can break that invisible but mighty chain that links the Basques all over the world.

The videos, recorded by Jenny Ysursa, were shared on the Instagram account of a US digital publication focusing on Basques, Euskal Kazeta.  It’s a reference site to get to know everything about the Basque community in tha tpart of the world.

After the postponement, twice, of the Jaialdi, it’s wonderful to see how the Basques of the US are starting to get together again.  We hope that Basque all over the world can soon resume their activity, not only for them and for the future of our nation, but also because it would mean the covid-19 pandemic is finally over.

We’ve often said, whenever discussing the Basque diaspora: where there are Basques, there is the Basque Country.  This has always been true, but now, in this “small” world we get to live in, it is even more true.

Seeing this video, we get the feeling we’re seeing a future that guarantees the survival of our culture throughout the world.  It would seem that this land of emigrants, this “people that lives and dances at the feet of the Pyrenees” as Voltaire defined us in his book, “The Princess of Babylon”, is going to continue leaving its mark on the world and on history.

Those gloomy premonitions from all quarters, for the past two centuries, that presaged, and still do, the disappearance of our culture and our homeland, have yet to come true.  These children in Nevada taking their first steps into Basque culture prove that they’re wrong, and that this future is as bright and thriving as the children are.

 

 

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Una publicación compartida de Euskal Kazeta (@euskalkazeta)