This article was translated by John R. Bopp

Sadie Dingfelder, in this article, explains to the readers of this newspaper from the American capital how the Basques and their culture are going to be the main event around which the 2016 edition of the Folklife Festival, a yearly event organized by the Smithsonian Institute on the National Mall in Washington, DC, will rotate.

One of the organizers of this year’s event, Mary Linn, explains the basics of the Basque presence under the motto “Basque: Innovation by Culture”.

We’ve been talking about this unique opportunity for the Basques to show the world what they’re really like for a year.  This is even more surprising to us because the “Sun” that is the image of the Smithsonian is going to turn into an Eguzkilorea (sunflower) for the duration of the festival, taking a place of honor in the heart of the American capital.

The Smithsonian “Sun” is turned into a Basque Eguzkilorea for the 2016 Folklife Festival
The Smithsonian “Sun” is turned into a Basque Eguzkilorea for the 2016 Folklife Festival

A jai alai court, with this eguzkilorea occupying a place of honor, will be a centerpiece of this great event, situated between the Washington Monument and the Capitol Building.

After the steel skeleton of the Folklife Festival Frontoia is secure with a six-foot mound of concrete, we hoist up the walls, strong enough for a round of #zestapunta pilota. That’s our tech director Tyler Nelson up top—he designed the Frontoia with input from #Basque architects and athletes. 📷: Whitney Brown, Folklife carpenter #2016Folklife #FrontoiaTechWeek

Una foto publicada por Smithsonian Folklife (@smithsonianfolklife) el

More than a million people will visit this representation of the Basque culture and way of life.

The Washington Post – 23/6/2016 – USA

Field day on the Mall: Play Basque sports at this year’s Folklife Fest

Anyone who’s competed in a three-legged race will feel at home at the 2016 Smithsonian Folklife Festival. “It will look a lot like a field day,” says Mary Linn, one of the festival curators. That’s because one of this year’s themes is “Basque: Innovation by Culture,” and sports are a big part of Basque communities, Linn says. (The other theme is “Sounds of California“). The Basque people have lived in the western Pyrenees for upward of 7,000 years. Their language has no relationship to any other living tongue — and that’s helped them hold on to their cultural identity and ancient traditions, Linn says.

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