We’re bringing you this information even though it has not (yet) been published in any international media outlets due to its extraordinary historical value.

Gernikazarra Historia Taldea has just shared two, thus far unpublished, photographs on their Facebook page.  They were taken from an insurgent Francoist observation plane, and in them, one can see the level of destruction of Guernica after the bombing on April 26.

The photographs, especially the second one, taken directly overhead, are truly shocking, showing the level of barbarism during the destruction and the attacks’ true aim.  Furthermore, it is irrefutable proof of the truthfulness of the official reports issued by the Basque Government about how many human lives were lost in the attack, and at the same time destroying the revisionist theories upheld by some historians who try to downplay it all.

Foto inéditas del Gernika bombardeado del día 28 de Abril de 1937 En el fondo documental del coronel rebelde Francisco Iglesias Brage, que se custodia en el Archivo del Reino de Galicia.
Unpublished photos of Guernica after the April 28, 1937 bombing.  Found among the documents of rebel colonel Francisco Iglesias Brage, held at the Reino de Galicia Archives.

This photo shows what we blogged about here, when we denounced all the lies that were told, from the day after the bombing to right now about this tragedy, in order to somehow excuse the murderers who carried this attack out, or to try to downplay the harm the attack caused on the people who were in the Sacred City of the Basques at that time.

All one has to do is to see the photo to understand the hell that must have befallen Guernica on April 26, much like how all one has to do is to see the photo to understand that anyone who claims that the goal was to bomb Rekalde Bridge (the small structure carrying the road from the ruins out the top center) is simply lying.

Foto inéditas del Gernika bombardeado del día 28 de Abril de 1937 En el fondo documental del coronel rebelde Francisco Iglesias Brage, que se custodia en el Archivo del Reino de Galicia.
Unpublished photos of Guernica after the April 28, 1937 bombing.  Found among the documents of rebel colonel Francisco Iglesias Brage, held at the Reino de Galicia Archives.

The goal was to destroy the city, in a massive, controlled bombing, causing as much damage as possible to the civil population while leaving intact the elements that were of interest to the insurgents: the arms factory and the train station (all of that is in the right part of the photo, and is untouched).

One has to admit that the test was a resounding success.  Almost 2,000 murdered, but the arms factory in one piece, just like the train line.  Excellent marksmanship by the German and Italian aviators who practiced over a Basque town what they would later start doing to all of Europe.

These photos lay bare what we’ve been saying for years, what Steer and Monks told the world in their chronicles.  What those journalists, the Basque Government, the British sailors who visited the ruins (possibly on the day before these photos were taken), and the survivors of the tragedy all told was true.

The photos were taken from a rebel airplane, crewed by rebel soldiers, in order for one the Joint Chiefs of the insurgents to know what the results of the attack had been and to confirm their efficacy.  These photos appeared at the Reino de Galicia Archives, as part of the documentary fund of insurgent colonel Francisco Iglesias Brage.  This is one of those few occasions when the appropriation of public goods by those who theoretically were supposed to be protecting them has helped preserve a part of History that would otherwise have been destroyed.

Because there are always politicians, historians, and journalists who are true believers in the maxim “don’t let the truth ruin a good headline” (or the version of events you want to sell).