This article was tranlated by Iustrans


Hannah Brown is in charge of the film criticism section of the English-language Israeli daily The Jerusalem Post. Born in New York, she was a film critic of the New York Post whilst living in that city. She has published a review of the Basque film “Loreak” (“Prahim le’Ana in Hebrew) in the Israeli daily.

This is not the first time we refer to this film in our blog ,  but it is the first time that we echo a review about the film’s features and quality.

The main conclusion we draw from said review is that Hannah Brown enjoyed the film directed by Jon Garaño and Jose Mari Goenaga; starring Nagore Aranburu, Egoitz Lhasa, Iztiar Aizpuru, and Itziar Ituño. She liked the story, how they tell it, and she liked the actors’ performances, although she did raise some objections to the way in which the directors resolved the film.

The sound of Basque language coming from the cinema’s screen caught her attention, and, as is usual, tries to find similarities, even at the level of phonetics.

It is interesting to know how a Basque film is perceived in a country with such a different culture, especially given how intimate and speacial “Loreak” is.


Movie Review: Basque bouquets

The film Loreak (Basque for “flowers”) is a delicate, quiet drama about how one element in life, in this case a gift of flowers, can touch and change many lives. The movie is set in the Basque region of Spain, but the story could take place anywhere in Europe or the world, for that matter. However, the Basque language, rarely heard on screen, gives it a slight exoticism. Basque doesn’t sound quite like any language. At times, it is similar to Romance languages, at other times it sounds more like Turkish, Portuguese or an Eastern European language.

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