This article was translated by John R. Bopp

This is not the first time we’ve talked about the interest for and presence of Basque-style cider in Oregon, or in deed, in the US.  It’s even gotten the recommendation of several media, such as The New York Times or CBS to use it to celebrate Thanksgiving!

"Sagardo" is the Basque word for cider.
“Sagardo” is the Basque word for cider.

Today, we bring you more news about our local “apple wine” in the US Pacific Northwest.  A new brand of cider called Son of Man has just been launched, and it’s the local adaptation of this beverage that, let’s not forget, is already hugely popular.  Now, in the States, when they think “cider,” they have different ideas, as the product itself describes: “is the complete opposite of brands like Woodchuck or Strongbow: It is achingly dry, high-acid apple cider that tastes like a cross between an earthy white wine and a Northwest-style sour beer”.

The cider maker, Jasper Smith, based his product on the ciders and his experience in Gipuzkoa.  Especially noteworthy is his choice of name and label decoration: a”Basajaun“, the mythical Basque “wild man”.  All we’re missing is a tuna fish omelette and a nice juicy steak!

Curiously, the report we’re sharing, written by Michael Albert for The Oregonian, tells this and a lot more about the relationship between this Oregon cider and Basque legend, withe name “Basajuan” being used to describe our mythological creature.

Small details that don’t hide but rather highlight the interesting history of Basque-style cider that’s now such a hit in the US.  What would the Basque whalers of the 15th century think if they knew that the drink that saved them from scurvy on their trips to North America would now, six centuries later, be all the rage on the Pacific coast?

The Oregonian – 13/2/2019 – USA

Son of Man is the first cidery in the Pacific Northwest to specialize in Basque-style cider, and its first batch will be released at an open house in late February. After one sip all I can ask is, “What took so long?”

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